Les orgues de Paris
ORGUES DE PARIS © 2018 Vincent Hildebrandt ACCUEIL A-Z

Mutin-Convers-Pleyel

After several years of serious financial difficulties, Aristide Cavaillé- Coll sold his company in 1898 to Charles Mutin, a pupil and former worker. Charles Mutin (1861-1931) entered the Cavaillé-Coll company as an apprentice at the age of 14, entrusted to Joseph Koening, one of the voicers of the company. 23 years later, he became the head of this renowned company. He continued the tradition of his former employer and built approx. 300 organs until his retirement in 1923. in 1924, Auguste Convers (1884-1976) took over the company: Manufacture d’orgues Cavaillé-Coll, Mutin, A. Convers et Cie . This was the start of a rapid decline of the quantity and in particular the quality of the instruments delivered, leading to a bankruptcy in 1928. The company was then converted into a joint-stock company Société anonyme française de facture d’orgues Cavaillé-Coll , while Convers started a new company on his own in 1929. In 1931, a new conversion was done into a Société fermière des Etablissements Cavaillé-Coll with Joseph Beuchet (1904-1970) as one of the directors. In 1934, the Pleyel firm took over and Joseph Beuchet resigned. In 1936, the Société Anonyme Cavaillé-Coll gave Pleyel an exclusive licence to the exploitation and sales, resulting in a new company Pleyel-Cavaillé-Coll . This construction was not successful too and the World War II formed its Waterloo.
Les orgues de Paris

Mutin-Convers-

Pleyel

ORGUES DE PARIS 2.0 © Vincent Hildebrandt COLOPHON
After several years of serious financial difficulties, Aristide Cavaillé- Coll sold his company in 1898 to Charles Mutin, a pupil and former worker. Charles Mutin (1861-1931) entered the Cavaillé-Coll company as an apprentice at the age of 14, entrusted to Joseph Koening, one of the voicers of the company. 23 years later, he became the head of this renowned company. He continued the tradition of his former employer and built approx. 300 organs until his retirement in 1923. in 1924, Auguste Convers (1884-1976) took over the company: Manufacture d’orgues Cavaillé-Coll, Mutin, A. Convers et Cie . This was the start of a rapid decline of the quantity and in particular the quality of the instruments delivered, leading to a bankruptcy in 1928. The company was then converted into a joint-stock company Société anonyme française de facture d’orgues Cavaillé-Coll , while Convers started a new company on his own in 1929. In 1931, a new conversion was done into a Société fermière des Etablissements Cavaillé-Coll with Joseph Beuchet (1904-1970) as one of the directors. In 1934, the Pleyel firm took over and Joseph Beuchet resigned. In 1936, the Société Anonyme Cavaillé-Coll gave Pleyel an exclusive licence to the exploitation and sales, resulting in a new company Pleyel-Cavaillé-Coll . This construction was not successful too and the World War II formed its Waterloo.