Les orgues de Paris
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Tous les facteurs d’orgues

qui travaillaient à Paris  avant la Révolution

Organ builders in the 17th and early

18th century 1/2

The Thierry dynasty

Founder Pierre Thierry (1604-1665) learned his skills from Valeran De Héman and Carlier (St Nicolas-des-Champs). Later he set up on his own workshop. He can be seen as Carlier’s successor. His masterpiece was the St Germain-des-Prés organ (1661). On the death of his associate Pierre Desenclos in 1664 he became facteur du roi. In addition to his son Alexandre Thierry, two of his other sons became organ builders: Jean (1638-1689) and Charles (1641-??). His son Alexandre Thierry (1646-1699) established himself as the leading French organ builder of his time with the completion of the organ at St Séverin in 1675 (built in collaboration with his brother Charles). He also built the organ at St. Louis des Invalides (1687). Towards the end of his life, he worked with Hippolyte Ducastel (Notre Dame, 1691) and Robert and Jean Baptiste Clicquot. François Thierry (1677-1749) was a nephew and a pupil of Alexandre Thierry and the last representative of the Thierry-dynasty. He learned his skills with his uncle (Alexandre), Pierre-François Deslandes and Henri Lesclop. He completely reconstructed the organ at Notre Dame, Paris (1730–33; apparently the first organ to be built with a separate Bombarde manual). Andreas Silbermann worked for him between 1704 and 1706.

Other organ builders in the 17/early 18th century

Photo’s: St Louis des Invalides - Notre-Dame-de-Paris
après la Révolution après la Révolution
allbuildersbr
Les orgues de Paris

All organ builders

who worked in Paris before the revolution

1  -    -   3   -    -    -   6

Organ builders in the 17th and early 18th

century 1/2

The Thierry dynasty

Founder Pierre Thierry (1604-1665) learned his skills from Valeran De Héman and Carlier (St Nicolas-des- Champs). Later he set up on his own workshop. He can be seen as Carlier’s successor. His masterpiece was the St Germain-des-Prés organ (1661). On the death of his associate Pierre Desenclos in 1664 he became facteur du roi. In addition to his son Alexandre Thierry, two of his other sons became organ builders: Jean (1638-1689) and Charles (1641- ??). His son Alexandre Thierry (1646-1699) established himself as the leading French organ builder of his time with the completion of the organ at St Séverin in 1675 (built in collaboration with his brother Charles). He also built the organ at St. Louis des Invalides  (1687). Towards the end of his life, he worked with Hippolyte Ducastel (Notre Dame, 1691) and Robert and Jean Baptiste Clicquot. François Thierry (1677-1749) was a nephew and a pupil of Alexandre Thierry and the last representative of the Thierry-dynasty. He learned his skills with his uncle (Alexandre), Pierre-François Deslandes and Henri Lesclop. He completely reconstructed the organ at Notre Dame, Paris (1730–33; apparently the first organ to be built with a separate Bombarde manual). Andreas Silbermann worked for him between 1704 and 1706.

Other organ builders in the 17/early 18th century

Photo’s: St Louis des Invalides - Notre-Dame-de-Paris
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