Les orgues de Paris
ORGUES DE PARIS © 2018 Vincent Hildebrandt           ACCUEIL       A-Z           

Autres facteurs d’orgue

du 19-20ème siècle

1-2-3

Muhleisen Pels-Dhondt    (Herselt,   Belgium).   Jean-Baptiste   D’Hondt   founded a   small   organ   building   firm   in   1892   near   Brussels.   In   the   middle of   the   XXth   century,   his   firm   merged   with   the   firm   of   Bernard Pels,   a   descendant   of   a   dynasty   of   organ   builders   (founded   by Bernard   Pels   I   in   1870),   located   at   Alkmaar,   Netherlands.   Since 1987,   the   firm   is   led   by   Gerard   Pels.   He   is   the   fourth   generation of    both    families.    After    the    construction    of    a    number    of    new organs,   the   firm   specialized   itself   towards   restoration   of   organs from   the   XVIth   to   XXth   century.   He   worked   on   the   organs   of Eglise   du   coeur   eucharistique   de   Jésus   (1947)   and   rebuilded   the organ of Saint-Joseph-des-épinettes  (2014) Rieger Jean    &    Edouard    (??-1952)    Ruche     (Lyon)    were    organbuilders active   during   the   first   half   of   the   XXth   century.   Charles   Meslé   (1914-2011)   was   voicer   at   this   firm.   He   continued   the   firm   after the   death   of   Edouard   in   1952.   The   firm   closed   in   1979.   He   built the   organ   of   Chapelle   des   Franciscaines   réparatrices   de   Jésus Hostie (1973). Pierre    Sarelot     (1930-2010)    and    Louis    Benoist    (*1931)    were organ   builders   in   Mans   (Laigné-en-Belin)   from   1968-1995   and were   doing   mainly   restoration   works.   They   worked   on   the   organ of    the    Chapelle    des    pères    Franciscains    and    the    Eglise    de L'immaculée   conception .   The   firm   was   taken   over   by   Jean-Pierre Conan (*1952) and closed in 2010. Georges    Schwenkedel    (1885-1958)    worked    first    at    the    firm Roethinger   and   created   later,   together   with   Ernest   Mulheisen (1897-1981),   the   Maison   Schwenkedel.   His   son   Curt   joined   the company.   In   1941,   Muhleisen   changed   to   building   neobaroque organs    and    his    company    was    renamed    into    Mulheisen    G. Walther   et   Associés,   directed   by   Georges   Walther.   Mulheisen’s brother-in-law,   Alfred   Kern ,   founded   a   company   in   Strasbourg   in 1953. Curt Schwenkedel ended his activities in 1972. A   new   organ   built   by   the   Schwenkedel   firm   is   located   in   Eglise Protestante Unie de Passy Annonciation  (1973). Yves   Sévère    (1929-2004)   was   the   stepson   and   pupil   of   Pierre Chéron,   whose   firm   he   continued   in   1963.   Chapelle   des   pères Franciscains ( 19xx).
Xavier Silbermann worked at Schwenkedel until 1958 and continued his activities on his own. He made 42 organs and restored or enlarged another 23 instruments. He worked on the organ of the Chapelle du couvent des Dominicains (1985). Laurent   Steinmetz    (??-2001)   and   his   brother   Chrétien   learned their   skills   at   the   Schwenkedel   firm.   They   started   their   own   firm in 1968. He built the organ of Saint-Gabriel (1982). Jean-Pierre Swiderski (*1940) He   learned   his   skills   at   the   Schwenkedel   firm,   where   he   was voicer.   After   that,   he   started   his   own   company   in   the   Parisian region.    He    worked    on    the    organs    of    Chapelle    de    l’Hôpital Lariboisière ,    Chapelle   du   Lycée   Jacques-Decour ,   Chapelle   Notre- Dame    du    bon    conseil ,    Eglise    Protestante    Unie    de    Pentemont Luxembourg      -   Chapelle   du   Luxembourg ,   Notre-Dame   d’Auteuil , Saint-Eloi ,   Saint-Jean-Baptiste   de   Belleville ,   Saint-Roch   (Chapelle de la Vierge) , Saint-Sulpice . L’abbé   Victor   Joseph   Henri   Tronchet    (1861-1945)   was   priest and   as   organ   builder   probably   autodidact.      He   created   his   firm   in Nogent-le-Rotrou   in   1887.      He   played   a   significant   role   in   the organ    building    of    Sarthe    and    the    surrounding    region.    His nephew   André   (??-1969)   continued   the   firm   from   1928   onwards. He built the organ of N otre-Dame du Liban (1910) Henry   Willis   &   Son   was   founded   in   1845   by   Henry   Willis,   who was   nicknamed   "Father   Willis"   because   of   his   contribution   to   the art   and   science   of   organ   building   and   to   distinguish   him   from   his younger   relatives   working   in   the   firm.   Five   generations   of   the Willis   family   served   as   principals   of   the   firm   until   1997   when Henry    Willis    IV    retired    and    David    Wyld    was    appointed    as managing director. The   Willis   firm   is   regarded   as   the   leading   organ   builder   of   the Victorian    era.    During    the    Industrial    Revolution    many    towns equipped   themselves   with   imposing   town   halls   and   churches, preferably   with   a   Willis   instrument   in   a   symphonic   style.   Henry Willis   IV   built   many   ‘Junior   Development   Plan   Organs’   which   he designed   to   be   economical   initially,   but   with   scope   for   expansion as   funds   became   available.   He   worked   on   the   organ   of   Saint- Joseph's Catholic Church.  
après la Révolution après la Révolution
Les orgues de Paris

Autres facteurs d’orgue

du 19-20ème siècle

1-2-3

ORGUES DE PARIS 2.0 © Vincent Hildebrandt     COLOPHON
after the revolution after the revolution
Muhleisen Pels-Dhondt    (Herselt,   Belgium).   Jean-Baptiste   D’Hondt   founded   a small   organ   building   firm   in   1892   near   Brussels.   In   the   middle   of the   XXth   century,   his   firm   merged   with   the   firm   of   Bernard   Pels,   a descendant   of   a   dynasty   of   organ   builders   (founded   by   Bernard Pels   I   in   1870),   located   at   Alkmaar,   Netherlands.   Since   1987,   the firm    is    led    by    Gerard    Pels.    He    is    the    fourth    generation    of    both families.   After   the   construction   of   a   number   of   new   organs,   the   firm specialized   itself   towards   restoration   of   organs   from   the   XVIth   to XXth    century.    He    worked    on    the    organs    of    Eglise    du    coeur eucharistique   de   Jésus   (1947)   and   rebuilded   the   organ   of   Saint- Joseph-des-épinettes  (2014) Rieger Jean   &   Edouard   (??-1952)   Ruche    (Lyon)   were   active   during   the   first half   of   the   XXth   century.   Charles   Meslé    (1914-2011)   was   voicer   at this   firm.   He   continued   the   firm   after   the   death   of   Edouard   in   1952. The    firm    closed    in    1979.    He    built    the    organ    of    Chapelle    des Franciscaines réparatrices de Jésus Hostie (1973). Pierre   Sarelot    (1930-2010)   and   Louis   Benoist   (*1931)   were   organ builders   in   Mans   (Laigné-en-Belin)   from   1968-1995   and   were   doing mainly    restoration    works.    They    worked    on    the    organ    of    the Chapelle    des    pères    Franciscains    and    the    Eglise    de    L'immaculée conception .   The   firm   was   taken   over   by   Jean-Pierre   Conan   (*1952) and closed in 2010. Georges     Schwenkedel     (1885-1958)     worked     first     at     the     firm Roethinger    and    created    later,    together    with    Ernest    Mulheisen (1897-1981),    the    Maison    Schwenkedel.    His    son    Curt    joined    the company.    In    1941,    Muhleisen    changed    to    building    neobaroque organs   and   his   company   was   renamed   into   Mulheisen   G.   Walther   et Associés,   directed   by   Georges   Walther.   Mulheisen’s   brother-in-law, Alfred    Kern ,    founded    a    company    in    Strasbourg    in    1953.    Curt Schwenkedel ended his activities in 1972. A    new    organ    built    by    the    Schwenkedel    firm    is    located    in    Eglise Protestante Unie de Passy Annonciation  (1973). Yves    Sévère     (1929-2004)    was    the    stepson    and    pupil    of    Pierre Chéron,    whose    firm    he    continued    in    1963.    Chapelle    des    pères Franciscains ( 19xx). Xavier Silbermann worked at Schwenkedel until 1958 and continued his activities on his own. He made 42 organs and restored or enlarged another 23 instruments. He worked on the organ of the Chapelle du couvent des Dominicains (1985). Laurent    Steinmetz     (??-2001)    and    his    brother    Chrétien    learned their   skills   at   the   Schwenkedel   firm.   They   started   their   own   firm   in 1968. He built the organ of Saint-Gabriel (1982). Jean-Pierre Swiderski (*1940) He   learned   his   skills   at   the   Schwenkedel   firm,   where   he   was   voicer. After   that,   he   started   his   own   company   in   the   Parisian   region.   He worked   on   the   organs   of   Chapelle   de   l’Hôpital   Lariboisière ,    Chapelle du    Lycée    Jacques-Decour ,    Chapelle    Notre-Dame    du    bon    conseil , Notre-Dame     d’Auteuil ,     Eglise     Protestante     Unie     de     Pentemont Luxembourg        -    Chapelle    du    Luxembourg ,    Saint-Jean-Baptiste    de Belleville , Saint-Roch (Chapelle de la Vierge) , Saint-Sulpice . L’abbé   Victor   Joseph   Henri   Tronchet    (1861-1945)   was   priest   and as    organ    builder    probably    autodidact.        He    created    his    firm    in Nogent-le-Rotrou   in   1887.      He   played   a   significant   role   in   the   organ building   of   Sarthe   and   the   surrounding   region.   His   nephew   André (??-1969)   continued   the   firm   from   1928   onwards.   He   built   the   organ of N otre-Dame du Liban (1910). Henry   Willis   &   Son   was   founded   in   1845   by   Henry   Willis,   who   was nicknamed   "Father   Willis"   because   of   his   contribution   to   the   art   and science   of   organ   building   and   to   distinguish   him   from   his   younger relatives   working   in   the   firm.   Five   generations   of   the   Willis   family served   as   principals   of   the   firm   until   1997   when   Henry   Willis   IV retired and David Wyld was appointed as Managing Director. The    Willis    firm    is    regarded    as    the    leading    organ    builder    of    the Victorian     era.     During     the     Industrial     Revolution     many     towns equipped    themselves    with    imposing    town    halls    and    churches, preferably    with    a    Willis    instrument    in    a    symphonic    style.    Henry Willis    IV    built    many    ‘Junior    Development    Plan    Organs’    which    he designed   to   be   economical   initially,   but   with   scope   for   expansion   as funds   became   available.   He   worked   on   the   organ   of   Saint-Joseph's Catholic Church.